Posts Tagged ‘Rebecca Olsavsky’

#INTEGRATE16 Bucket List

June 3, 2016

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Welcome to INTEGRATE16, fellow Mountaineers! As an experienced INTEGRATE attendee (since 2014) and a WVU IMC alum (Class of 2015), I’m looking forward to catching up with the IMC community over the next two days.

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Let’s Go Mountaineers! I met the WVU Mountaineer during last year’s networking reception at INTEGRATE15.

Whether you’re new to the conference or have made it a tradition to attend, I’d like to suggest some INTEGRATE16 “bucket list” items for your consideration…

  • Get social (media). This should be natural for a group of IMC folks, but remember to join the conversation on Twitter using the #INTEGRATE16 hashtag! We usually feature some of our favorite tweets on the blog. Not sure whose selfie stick took that group photo? You’ll probably find the picture on Instagram.
  • Raise your hand. INTEGRATE provides an opportunity to learn from experienced professionals about how they approach their work. Ask questions during the conference sessions; these often spark some of the most interesting group discussions.
  • Talk to an IMC instructor. It’s so nice to chat with our instructors offline. Some of my instructors have even remembered my class projects when I’ve talked with them at INTEGRATE. Don’t be shy!
  • Get a taste of Morgantown. Even if you don’t have time to visit Coopers Rock, check out Peace, Love & Little Donuts — a new local favorite and a very short walk from the Hilton Garden Inn. I waited 45 minutes in line when they first opened!
Last year I ended my INTEGRATE experience with a visit to Coopers Rock with fellow bloggers Kat and Julie.

Last year I ended my INTEGRATE experience with a visit to Coopers Rock with fellow bloggers Kat and Julie.

Seriously, these donuts are delicious! I recommend the Samoa and Cinnamon Sugar.

Seriously, these donuts are delicious! I recommend the Samoa and Cinnamon Sugar.

Are you an INTEGRATE alum? If so, what’s on your “bucket list” for this year’s conference?

-Rebecca

How 360-Degree Video Changes The YouTube Experience

June 15, 2015

It’s the next step to a more immersive video experience.

YouTube now supports 360-degree video, meaning likes and comments aren’t the only way for people to feel connected to the content they’re watching.

The addition enables viewers to explore video content beyond typical limitations of what’s visible in the frame.

With the power of 360, desktop users can use the mouse to navigate a pan button to look right or left, up or down– even behind, putting the viewer in control of what’s in frame.

Mobile users can either touch the screen or simply move their device to change the angle of what’s being viewed. The mobile experience, much more than desktop, is incredibly intuitive.

So who is publishing 360 content?

Musicians:

Vloggers:

Adrenaline junkies:

Dubai360 recently released the world’s first 8k resolution 360 video:

 

How will 360 video influence digital marketing? 

-R

#Integrate15: Networking

May 30, 2015

The day sessions at INTEGRATE are a fascinating, educational component of the two-day experience. Equally enjoyable, however, are the opportunities to socialize outside of these scheduled presentations.

I’ve met WVU IMC instructors, former classmates, fellow bloggers and new IMC friends. INTEGRATE conversations are an incredible reminder of the range of talent and experience connected with this conference.

Here are some photos from Friday’s Graduate Pinning Ceremony and Networking Reception:

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Shout out to my fellow WVU IMC bloggers attending #Integrate15! I first met Kat and Julie last year at INTEGRATE. Sarah and I met at graduation in May; we also shared the same Capstone course. It’s great connecting with these bloggers in person.

 

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WVU IMC graduates participating in the Graduate Pinning Ceremony on Friday. Thanks to Tyler for snapping this shot with a selfie stick!

 

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Becky, Becky and I thought we would take a “Rebecca” photo as we all share the same name. This was my first time meeting these two, and they were so friendly! One of the great things about INTEGRATE is how easy it is to start a conversation with anyone attending. Meeting others who share your passion (and in my case, name!) is always inspiring.

 

What was your favorite part about Friday evening’s events? Did you meet any former classmates or instructors?

 

#Integrate15: Move Over, Millennials. Generation Z Is Here.

May 30, 2015

Millennials aren’t kids anymore.

There’s a new generation capturing marketers’ attention, as Patti Girardi explained during Friday’s INTEGRATE breakout session titled “Marketing to Generation Z.”

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I enjoyed having the opportunity to chat more about Generation Z with Girardi, also a WVU IMC instructor, at Friday’s networking reception.

 

Who is this rising generation? Born between 1995 and 2010, those in Generation Z are currently in the age range of 5-20 years old. While young, they represent more than 25% of the population and command $44 billion in spending power—meaning marketers cannot ignore them or just toss them under the millennial umbrella.

While millennials—Generation Y—are frequently described as tech savvy, Generation Z is tech innate. Think millennials’ average multitasking of 2 digital screens is excessive? Generation Z averages five.

It’s no surprise that Generation Z expects brands to be on point on all social platforms as the group doesn’t differentiate between the internet and social media. In fact, many search brands’ social media rather than websites when seeking online resources about things like schools.

A focused and realistic group, Generation Z place high value on rallying around social causes. As many volunteer and show concern for the planet, they want to do work that makes an impact on the world. Both 9/11 and the Great Recession have been defining moments in shaping Generation Z youth.

Also a key influence on Generation Z is the dynamic of the young group often living in multi-generational households. Further, they often take the diversity associated with millennials to the next level as many are multiracial.

For marketers trying to effectively approach this new generation, storytelling, trust-building, and establishing a brand-consumer friendship are important.  As Girardi said, “If they believe in what you’re selling, they’re all about it.”

How do you think Generation Z will influence the future of integrated marketing?

The Story Behind STORY

April 15, 2015

A Manhattan-based retailer is turning the page on brick-and-mortar expectations. STORY has a magazine POV, changes like a gallery, and sells things like a store. (It’s like a Pinterest board come to life.)

With its product as content, and its content changing completely monthly or bi-monthly as well as being for sale, STORY has embraced its retail media status. Past themes including Well Being, Design, Made in America, and Cool reflect how STORY has continued to reinvent its space and product stock while inspiring an audience. Experiential storytelling is the steady factor.

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There’s always something new inside STORY.

Brands both new and established have sought to become part of STORY’s themes. From General Electric to celebrity-status YouTubers, STORY has the ability to extend its content and reach beyond typical niche retail markets by partnering with a new set of brands every few weeks.

How has media inspired other brick-and-mortar retailers and brought together unlikely brands?

-R

 

 

How To Name A Marketing Agency

April 13, 2015

The first surprising thing I discovered in my IMC Capstone journey is that naming a marketing agency really tests your creative skill. Idea? Google it. Already taken. Better idea? Backspace and Google again. Also taken.

It’s a process I recommend starting before Week 1 if you can. I learned to prioritize the “how” of my then yet-to-be-named agency. How did I want my agency to approach a client’s project? That starting point inspired me to then relate my concept to less-literal names, finally leading me to a winner.

During this process, I stumbled upon a helpful agency name graphic I hope you’ll find just as useful.

While I mostly recognized the Founder names, the other categories offered the most inspirational ideas during my brainstorming process.

Because Capstone requires you to thread your agency’s unique approach throughout your integrated marketing proposal for the chosen client, take some time to build a strong foundation for your project. Having a clear agency identity makes writing other sections in your project easier to accomplish because you have a defined perspective to work from.

WVU IMC alum, current and future Capstoners: What advice/comments/questions do you have about naming a marketing agency?

-R

Quarter-Life Crisis? Origins Understands.

March 18, 2015

Being a twenty-something is tough… on your skin. At least, that’s the connection Origins is making in an effort to reach women in their 20s with its #QuarterLifeCrisis campaign.

 

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Origins is pushing a new skin renewal serum to twenty-somethings through its Quarter-Life Crisis social media campaign.

 

The skincare company has embraced the “tongue-in-cheek quandaries” used by the target market on platforms like Twitter to guide its witty approach to the campaign that is designed to promote the launch of the brand’s Original Skincare Renewal serum.

 

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#QuarterLifeCrisis

 

Scroll through Origins’ Twitterfeed and you’ll find quirky, relatable content with humor that is worthy of a retweet.

Does this campaign have longevity, or will it grow old quickly with millennials?

-R

A 20-Something’s Take on J.Crew Segmentation

March 12, 2015

Shopping for clothes online, it’s instinct to immediately find your designated section as a consumer. Women. Men. Girls. Boys. Baby. 

J.Crew’s new take on the e-commerce experience is quite refreshing as the apparel company invites female site visitors to shop “Style At Every Age.” Instead of just shopping by category, women can find inspiration by their age. Whether you’re in your 20s, 30s, 40s, or 50s+, the company has a feature collection of clothing and accessories available for that target.

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J.Crew Creative Director Jenna Lyons is quoted on the site: “In my 20s, I wore rollneck sweaters, with short shorts. A lot has changed since then. Some 20+ years later, I still love J. Crew . . . just differently. Here are four women whose style I admire . . . different is beautiful. xx Jenna”

Personally, I found it an enjoyable browsing experience as it almost felt like Pinterest, J.Crew-style. Plus, for each age group, the company features a model showing off her style.  I wonder, however, how well this concept could transition to the men’s section.

Should more apparel brands adopt J.Crew’s market segmentation approach?

-R

 

The Best of #TheDress

March 3, 2015

At this point, who doesn’t have an opinion on #TheDress?

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The question of February 26, 2015: What color is the dress?

I’m guessing I wasn’t the only IMC student whose favorite part of the dress debacle involved seeing how brands capitalized on its viral hashtags. You can view some of the best brand tweets here, but I’ve also included some favorites from my Twitter feed below:

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Fans of the ABC modern fairytale show loved seeing character references of Snow White and Mr. Gold (Rumplestiltskin) connected to #TheDress.

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Cirque du Soleil wasn’t afraid to offer their unique opinion of #TheDress color…

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…and IKEA agreed. Is anyone else on team #blueandyellow?

What are your favorite brand references to #TheDress?

-R

 

If Steve Jobs Made Apple Juice

January 26, 2015

Steve Jobs helped bring to life the Apple iPod, iPhone and iPad, but he didn’t make Apple juice.

iJuice isn’t out of the question—well, in theory at least. Designer Peddy Mergui released a series of packaging designs transforming packaging what-if’s into reality using famous brands’ design language. Among his designs was iMilk.

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Got iMilk?

Whether you find Tiffany & Co. yogurt, Nike oranges, and Prada flour laughable or ingenious, they beg the question: Would consumers buy them?

Jobs is famous for defining design as how something works, not just how it looks or feels. I wonder what he would have thought about Mergui’s collection.

Not every brand extension works. Zippo perfume, Bic underwear, and Ben-Gay aspirin all come to mind. Of course, these extensions were inspired more by brand name than design.

Would you buy Apple juice?

-R