Putting the Pieces Together

by

Hello IMC World!  I hope everyone’s having a good week so far. The snow finally started melting in Morgantown this week, but it looks like we’re going to get some more just in time for the weekend. Oh well. Maybe the snow will fill in some of the potholes on the roads.

This week I started working on a PR plan for my “client” for this semester. Since most of my professional experience has been in PR, I feel a little bit better about this assignment than I have about some of the others. A few weeks ago I had to create a media plan, and I haven’t done anything like that since my undergraduate classes a few years ago—OK, several years ago. It was a little scary! But I got through it just fine, and all the pieces of my IMC campaign are starting to come together—which is exciting!

One of my favorite things about this class is the diversity of the people in it. My classmates are of all different ages, come from across the country, and are from all sorts of professional backgrounds. If I’m struggling with a particular topic, I can look to them for help. Some of the younger students in my class have a lot of knowledge about new technology and are comfortable with emerging media. Honestly, I thought I was pretty technology-savvy, but some of my classmates talk about things I’ve never even heard of! I also have several classmates who have been in the industry a long time, and they offer real-life, practical examples of some of the weekly topics we discuss.

When I tell people that I’m taking all of my IMC courses online, one of the questions I’m often asked is if I feel disconnected from my classmates or my instructor because I’m not in a traditional classroom setting. My answer to that is no—never.  In fact, for me the opposite is true. Believe it or not, I was the painfully shy kid—the one who never spoke up in class unless participation was part of my grade. My co-workers nicknamed me “Bernie”—the dead guy from the ’80s movie “Weekend at Bernie’s”—because I never spoke up.

Don’t ask me how I ever ended up in PR. I think it’s because I was really bad at math. Anyway, the IMC virtual classroom setting is great for everyone–even shy weirdos like me. I’m sure most of my classmates would agree with me (classmates, feel free to chime in anytime here …). Instead of getting to know just a few people I’d sit beside in a traditional classroom, I feel like I’ve gotten to know every single person in my class this semester.

Before I sign off here, I want to share with you a new product my classmate Megan wrote about in her discussion post this week. It’s called “Puppy Tweets” and it will be released this fall.  According to a CNN article, now your dog will now be able to tweet with you throughout the day with a special dog tag device. I don’t know about you, but I think this is pretty hilarious. I’m thinking Christmas presents for a few of my friends with furry children. You’ve been warned. Thanks, Megan!

5 Responses to “Putting the Pieces Together”

  1. Katharine Belcher Says:

    Love your blog. Stacy, you make me want to return to school! I am most excited to learn of Dog Tweets. Thanks for sharing. Oh, and it’s snowing. SCF!

  2. Meg Moore Says:

    I love this Blog Stacy! This is a great idea for people who are interested in learning more about the IMC Program and you state everything very well. I am, indeed, more than excited about the Puppy Tweets coming out this fall! Thank you for mentioning it in the Blog. 🙂

  3. angelawvu Says:

    Hi Stacy, great blog! I love the PuppyTweets also but probably not as much as my fiance’ will. Our dog & cat are our “kids” right now and I commonly hear my fiance’ wishing out loud that our dog could talk. So a little hook up with Puppy Tweets sounds great to me.

    Also, I saw your note about being tech savvy and learning a few things from classmates. Just wondering if you’ve joined a Twibe on Twitter yet? I recently discovered this and made one for my current course – http://twibes.com/WVU_EmergingMedia Stop by if you get a few spare moments (good luck with that!)

    We’re doing blogs in this course also and I’ve learned a tremendous amount about social media. Good Luck on the rest of your journey!

    http://angelawvu.wordpress.com/

    • stacywise Says:

      Hello!

      I haven’t heard of Twibe, but I will definitely check it out! For my IMC 610 class discussion one week, our instructor had us select and write about a social media channel from the Solis Conversational Prism. I had NO IDEA there were so many applications for Twitter! It’s crazy!

      I’m excited to take the Emerging Media class. I had planned to take it in Late Spring, but I think I’m going to postpone it until next year. Who knows what new things will be introduced between now and then …

  4. Kevin Says:

    I couldn’t agree more about feeling more connected to my fellow students in the IMC courses. As an undergraduate it was easy to slip in and out of a class room and never find out the name of the person who is setting next to you. Anonymity was easy. Not so in the IMC program.

    Our weekly discussions give us plenty of opportunity to get to know our classmates. “Outside” of class I have become friends with some classmates on Facebook and Twitter. This adds more depth to our relationship because we get to interact with one another outside of the educational setting. Reading their status updates and perusing their photo albums help to connect us on a more personal level. It also helps us to stay connected when a particular class ends and we move on to the next one.

    I am thankful for the connections I’ve made so far and I look forward to the ones ahead.

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